5 Things That Make Orange Walk Town in Belize a Great Retirement Landing Spot

Orange Walk town in Northern Belize may not be the first place that future Expats think of when investigating a retirement home.

Situated about 30 miles from the Belize/Mexico border to the North, Orange Walk is a bustling town of about 14,000 real folks. It’s actually about the 4th largest town in Belize, outside of Belize City and the capital city of Belmopan to the South.

The New River winds along the East side of Orange Walk town, inviting Expats to consider it for their permanent retirement location.

Feel free to investigate via Wikipedia more of the Capital of Orange Walk District here.

But for those looking for these 5 things, it may be a perfect place to enjoy the rest of your life.

Orange Walk’s Location is pretty strategic

Orange Walk’s Central location is inland from the Sea about 30 miles to the Northeast and 25 miles to the East.

And for those who aren’t the “water-type” or who fear the affects of the intermittent hurricanes or rising seas, Orange Walk is quite sheltered from the elements.

There are miles and miles of foliage and sugarcane fields between Orange Walk and the nearest coast.

When the islands are rebuilding from the latest tropical storm, Orange Walk is business as usual.

And did you know that the Northern Highway, one of only 3 main roads in Belize, runs smack dab through the middle of Orange Walk?

So whether you are headed to the airport in Belize City, or to the Mexican border to the North, the Northern Highway takes you there. And you’ll also connect to the Hummingbird Highway for adventure further south or to connect on your way to Belmopan or San Ignacio.

So if you plan to set up shop in Belize, you can count on plenty of traffic on the Northern Highway to find your business in Orange Walk.

Orange Walk
The colors that greet you in Orange Walk town are definitely caribbean in style and give the entire town a festive feel no matter what time of year.

And we haven’t even talked about the fact that the Cuello distillery and the sugar factory in Tower Hill employ a good number of the Orange Walk residents. That’s one reason that Orange Walk is known locally as “Suga City”.

Orange Walk’s Dining Choices are Diverse and Cultural

Talk to anyone in Belize about Orange Walk and the first thing that they will mention is “the best street tacos and tamales in Belize”.

Linda, who grew up in Orange Walk, is biased, but she puts it this way: “Any Belize product made with corn is best in Orange Walk. Whether it be the street taco on the corner or the tamales made to order, Orange Walk continually outranks the other areas of Belize.”

For $2, you can buy 10 of the best pulled pork tacos with hot pepper at any number of corner taco stands on the Northern Highway. So for $4, even the heartiest of appetites can be satisfied. My large brother-in-law can attest to that!

Taco stands seem to be on every street corner in Orange Walk. Their reputation as having the best tacos and tamales in all of Belize makes the locals proud.

And when the weekend parties are being planned, there are a number of spots to pre-order your made-to-order tamales. Bottom line: the corn is moister, the sauce is hotter and the folks keep coming back for more.

Several restaurants in Orange Walk are well worth mentioning as offering the Expats and locals great food at reasonable prices.

Nahil Mayab:

This restaurant is about 2 block West of the Northern Highway at the corner of Guadalupe and Santa Ana Streets. Find the Shell station on the Highway, known to the locals as Belize Road, then head west.

Besides the steak and pork chop, pasta and fish selections, Nahil Mayab features a number of great local favorites such as Cashew Wine Pasta.

Proudly Belizean inspired, according the Nahil Mayab, it includes whole shrimps and chunks of fish fillet flambéed in a cashew wine tomato sauce, served on a bed of linguini; accompanied by garlic bread.

And if you have never had Cashew Wine, it’s fermented in the nearby town of Crooked Tree from the fruit of the Cashew Tree. Quite a unique taste and an unusual kick!

This plastic bottle looks innocent enough, and the contents was bought on the side of Northern Highway near Crooked Tree, but the Cashew Wine inside is as potent as it gets. All for about $5.00 U.S.

According to local stories, it mixes with the Belizean humidity and heat to create a buzz that can come back for a number of days. Beware!

Cocina Sabor:

Owned by local Orange Walk resident Oscar Gutierrez, Cocina Sabor is on the South side of Orange Walk, right on Northern Highway.

Oscar opened Cocina Sabor after many successful years as the chef at Victoria House Pamilla Restaurant on Ambergris Caye.

Cocina Sabor boast international flavors and the expertise of Chef Oscar Gutierrez who spent many years honing his skill on Ambergris Caye before coming back home to Orange Walk.

He decribes his menu this way:

“Our menu has Belizean Cuisine with a hint of international flavor; featuring our local meats, chicken, seafood, and an array of appetizers. Our bar offers a wide selection of beverages ranging from cold beers, fresh fruit juices, to cocktails and wine.”

It features an outdoor porch as well as plenty of inside seating along with a full-service bar. Pick anything on the menu and you can’t go wrong. I have never had a bad meal here and have found myself there quite often.

I guess that fact that our parcel of land sits about 6 blocks behind Cocina Sabor made it a great place to meet with contractors, utility personnel and others. Anytime we need to escape the heat or check our email when in Orange Walk, we end up at Cocina Sabor.

I could mention a number of other restaurants for you to try in Orange Walk, but I think you get the hint. Food is king in Orange Walk. If you have some recommendations, please comment on them below!

Orange Walk is the place to go Shopping in Northern Belize

As the most populated town in Northern Belize, Orange Walk has the reputation as the “go-to” place for shopping in the area.

Sure, you can go North and across the border into Chetumal for a North America type shopping experience, but if you don’t want the wait of crossing the border, you can get most of what you need in Orange Walk.

In fact, many who live in the Corozal District find themselves navigating over to Orange Walk instead of taking the closer trip to the border.

Going to the local butcher in Orange Walk had Linda buying mutton for a birthday party.

If you need a butcher, it’s there. If you need fruits, vegetables and plants, the marketplace by town square is open every day.  You’ll also find clothing, groceries, automotive parts, electronics, internet and cellular services, furniture, home improvement, beauty salons and supplies, hardware and much more in Orange Walk town.

And the few times where you can’t find what you need, you can make a weekend trip to Chetumal, Mexico where Shopping Malls, Sam’s Club, Home Depot and others are waiting for your business.

Orange Walk is a Gem on the New River

The New River winds its way through Orange Walk’s East side and up into the remainder of Northern Belize before emptying into the Corozal Bay.

Besides the usual advantages of being on a river, Orange Walk boasts a number of businesses on the New River that service the culinary needs of the locals and cater to the growing tourism of the area.

One such tourist adventure on the Southern area of Orange Walk off of Naranja Street is a row of riverside cabins on the New River called El Gran Mestizo, owned by the De La Fuentes who also own the bustling downtown Orange Walk Hotel De La Fuente .

From these private cabins you can dine at Maracas Bar and Grill, and then start your adventure vacation and take in a number of adventure tours down the New River.

Maracas Bar and Grill is a welcoming place down by the New River that is part of the El Mestizo River Cabins.

You can find descriptions and rates on their web site.

The most popular tour is 15 miles south of Orange Walk to the Lamanai Mayan Temple and Ruins. Businesses that want to capitalize on this tourist traffic in Orange Walk should make Orange Walk a stop on their next trip.

Lamanai Mayan Ruins Tour is an all-day affair that takes you down the New River to the Mayan Temple.

Linda and I had the pleasure of staying at both the De La Fuente Hotel and the El Gran Mestizo Riverside Cabins on our most recent trip and enjoyed the ambiance of each.

Other Hotels to investigate in Orange Walk include:

  • Hotel St. Christopher’s
  • Orchid Palm Inn

Orange Walk offers a laid back life that encourages a healthy lifestyle

In this section, I’ll cover a number of areas that together, combine to make Orange Walk a serious consideration for you retirement years.

Healthcare:

No third-world country will offer the healthcare that will equal what you have experienced in the U.S. or Europe.

With that said, Orange Walk feature one of three regional government-run Hospitals on the North side of town.

Although it is not up-to-par with the Hospitals in Belize City and Belmopan, it is affordable and adequate for daily health concerns that may come up.

There are a few private facilities in the area that will offer better care from Doctors trained overseas.

Other medical options include going 30 miles north over the Mexican border to Chetumal, where healthcare is cheaper, but skilled.

For major procedures, many Expats choose to head to the U.S. or their home country. This is true of every part of Belize, however.

For more on the Healthcare in Belize, you might like this article.

Lifestyle:

There are plenty of things to do in Orange Walk whether it be spending social time at the town square, learning the local favorite, Dominos, or playing soccer (futbol).

Dominos
In Orange Walk, lots of time is spent chatting, drinking and teasing each other about Dominos skill.

Muffles college is close by for expanding your horizons and there are opportunities to volunteer at a number of area churches.

For those who prefer nightlife, the Hi 5 Night Club in downtown Orange Walk gets 4.8 out of 5 stars on Facebook.

Daytrips are easy from Orange Walk.

We have talked about Chetumal, Mexico, but virtually every area of Belize is accessible within no more than a few hours drive.

Belize City, Belmopan, Hopkins and Placencia Penninsula are well worth the trip. You also will enjoy the cool breezes in the San Ignacio and up in the Mountain Pine area.

And Tropic Air makes daily flights out to Ambergris Caye.

Housing:

If you plan to purchase land and build, there are a number of subdivisions in Orange Walk to Investigate.

Land is more affordable in Orange Walk than on the seaside. Investigate Dr. George Estates West of the Northern Highway where many new homes are currently going up.

This home is one of the new ones being built in the Dr George Estate subdivision of Orange Walk.

And if you need some possible architects and lawyers, we’ll be happy to refer a few that we know as well as a number of builders.

As you can see, Orange Walk offers a lot for those who want to live inland, centrally located to other parts of Belize.

Of course, we are biased due to it being Linda’s hometown, but that gives us a perspective on Orange Walk that could be valuable to you during your search.

Let us know how we can help!

A Corozal Seafood Restaurant Worth Locating!

Inside the Restaurant It not so easy to spot, but this great little seafood restaurant, owned by Beizeans, is well worth finding.  We found time to eat here twice during our recent trip, and that’s saying something for Linda, who is very discriminating when it comes to food.

Art Higgins, an expat who showed us homes and lots for sale in the Mayan Seaside development gave us the nudge to go.

It’s called Marisqueria Pisces Restaurant. And you won’t find it until you’ve meandered through the North end of Corozal on Consejo Road in the Altamira area.

Once you pass the cemetery on your right, look for a little white sign on the left side. Don’t be afraid. It may look like a dirt road dead end, but it leads to seafood nirvana!

About 1/2 mile down on your left, you can’t miss it, planted among spanish-style residences. They’re open Wednesday thru Monday from 11 a.m. – Midnight. Today we got there early before the lunch crowd.

Marisqueria Pisces Restaruant sign
Just look for the powder blue and cream building and come with an appetite!

The six of us started with our usual conch ceviche. We tried it just about every place we ate, but the chips and big chucks of conch made this ceviche stand out. It didn’t last long. And washing it down with Belikin or Lighthouse beer was a great start.

The real treat came when our server told us they had whole red snapper today. she even brought them out for us to see so we could order the size we wanted. We all chose the mid-sized one at $25 BZ so as not to feel like total pigs.

Dinner is Served.
The fresh fried snapper came out to a round of oohs and aahs. Nothing like the smell of a perfectly done red snapper.

Perfect plates of fried whole red snapper made their way to the table complete with black beans, salad and an assortment of pepper sauce and cups of freshly cut habeñero peppers.

After a short warning to the group from Linda to refrain from talking while eating so bones could easily be found, everyone dug in for what would be our first and best meal of the day. The silence confirmed it.

The before picture
The red snapper dwarfed the plate, while the rice, beans and salad made for nice complements to a great meal.

It didn’t take long to create a facsimile of the Bonefish Grill logo with each of the red snappers. Even the one who had never had whole fish before managed to clean off her bones like a pro. Garfield would have been proud!

Lunch was finished with another beer for dessert, while others opted for Piña Coladas. The small bar at the front of the restaurant would be full after dinner tonight.

The bar
The bar sits empty right now, but something tells me the stool wouldn’t be empty tonight. The mural of the Caribbean Sea would draw them in for sure.

The Marisqueria Pisces Restaurant is now a go-to place for us when in the Corozal area. It epitomizes the charm of Belizean local food and was a highlight of our trip. Thanks for the tip, Art.