Kenny: Belizean Construction Worker or High Beam Gymnast?

When does your home building project turn into a performance?

When one of the workers uses fancy foot-work from high work spaces.

His name is Kenny and he has worked on many projects in Belize.

It shows.

He enjoys the challenge of scaling the heights where other workers would never go.

When asked if he feared heights, he calmly shrugged from his 10-foot high 2×4 perch and quips, “I’ve been lots higher than this.”

His fellow workers know full well and nod in agreement while commencing in typical construction banter. The giggling is infectious.

Below are some of the awkward, and at times, poetic positions that Kenny found himself in during this typical work week.

Enjoy the artistry, skill and sense of calm that Kenny displays.

Kenny has no problem measuring precisely from atop his wooden perch.
Kenny uses a bit of down time to rest while balancing on a 2×4. There really was no place else to go.
Leverage and balance are needed when trying to hammer from the top of a palapa. The heat and plenty of sweat doesn’t make the job any easier.
Kenny simultaneously balances and holds two 2 x 4 studs in a centered position to form the pitch of the roof. He sat and held it for about 5 minutes while his co-worker, Fred, measured and made slight adjustments to get the perfect angle. It probably felt like much more than 5 minutes to Kenny.
Holding the pitch takes strength and concentration while Fred measures. Kenny would hold it steady until the correct angle was drawn onto each board so they could be cut correctly … and then held again while it was nailed into place.
Hammering causes plenty of vibrations while Kenny tries to balance and hold a 2×4 into place with a vice grip. These planks are made of a Belizean hardwood, much heavier than the pine used in the U.S.
Expensive industrial zinc sheets were used for the roofing and had to be cut while in place using an angle grinder. Hot sparks flew into his legs, but Kenny held steady until the job was done.
Toes, knees and contorted muscles are all needed to steady yourself while measuring and marking at the very tip of the roof line. Not much to grab onto if you slip from this position, Nothing but concrete floor below you.
Their tools may not be the best, but teamwork and a desire to get it done right are key traits of a Belizean construction team. Here, Fred and Kenny feel the heat of a 95-degree day as they assemble the zinc roofing for our palapa project.
Even when Kenny was lucky enough to be at ground level, the team still took advantage of his long legs and arms to hold high framing into place. No rest for the weary.
Acrobats like Kenny need to be able to handle any tool at any angle.
The July Belize heat wears on any worker, especially during the early afternoon hours when many other workers take off of work for an afternoon siesta to escape the hottest part of the day. Kenny took a quick lunch and was right back at it to get the job done on time.
The team got done on time and was treated a feast of Relleno, a local dish of stuffed Chicken, stuffing and more in a dark tasty spice broth. Kenny used the time to ask question after question about Trump, American politics and share his views about the current state of America from his vantage point.

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